To Love a Monster

Last night, I got to view Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald with some very good friends of mine. Though there are some fantastic views and great setup for what is to come, there is one line, said by Leta Lestrange, which stuck out to me more than all the magic and fantastic creatures that this film has to offer: “Oh Newt. You never met a monster you couldn’t love.”

Newt Scamander is one of the movie’s main protagonists, who is an odd character choice for such a role, for Gryffindor and Slytherin type personalities are the most prominent character choices for lead roles, yet Newt is an awkward Hufflepuff, who has a heart for magical beasts, many who are often misunderstood by the magical community. And Leta considers herself a monster, because of the dark secret she carries of a deed which she has done. Continue reading

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Matthew 25

It’s sad that the Canadian Down Syndrome Society feels like they need to make this video; however, church, this means that we’re not doing our job. Like Jesus, we are commanded to take care of the least of these. As it says in James 1:27, Religion that is pure and undefiled before God the Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their affliction, and to keep oneself unstained from the world. Christianity is more than a Sunday thing. It’s loving and caring for widows and orphans, the least fortunate and the outcasts of society. Like our Savior who made physical contact with lepers and defended a prostitute, we’re supposed to care and to love for those whom society thinks is worthless. After all, doesn’t James also say that faith without works is dead (James 2:14-26)? No, our works will not save us, but as Christians, we are supposed to be his light in this world, and as 1 John challenges us, Christianity is a lifestyle, not a list of obligations. Continue reading

The Hands of Jesus

There’s a painting upon a wall,
Of my Lord, Jesus Christ,
Etched in paints and colors,
Depicting a man of light.
To each the painting means something a little different,
To some a foe a myth,
But to the Christian a Savior and friend.

To many they see his eyes,
Warmed by the love the painter tries to show,
While others they notice his blood,
Horrified by the gruesome death and gore.
Yet others notice his skin,
How it’s not historically correct,
But when I see this painting of Jesus,
I can’t help but to be drawn to his hands. Continue reading

“The Butterfly Circus”

Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls of all ages. You are invited to view a spectacular feature! A short film that has surprised several audiences with its heartfelt messages. A story of doubt, hope, change, and love. A glimpse into the heart of Christ himself. Ladies and gentlemen, without further hesitation, I present to you, The Butterfly Circus!

Life Lessons from The Greatest Showman

The Greatest Showman may not be the most historically accurate depiction of the life of P. T. Barnum; nonetheless, it is currently very popular, and has a huge audience singing to its songs on the road, in the home, and in the shower. Other than having a neat story and catchy tunes, one reason that this film has become so popular, is because of the messages that it shares. That it’s okay to be different, to dream, and to take risks. But on top of that, it’s also cool how the messages in this movie, correlate with messages found in the Bible:

Continue reading

Faith, Love, and Pride

“Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God.” (Matthew 5:9)

In the fifth century, a monk by the name of Telemachus believed he had heard a voice that had told him to leave his home in Asia and to travel to Rome. Spurred by this calling, Telemachus left. While visiting the crown of the Roman Empire, he followed a crowd into the Colosseum. There, he witnessed two gladiators who were fighting in the ring, and Telemachus was horrified by what he saw. He jumped over the wall that separated the crowd from the fight and tried to get between the two men to stop them, shouting three times, “In the name of Christ, stop!” But despite his words, the man was run through with a sword, and was then stoned to death by the angry crowd who didn’t want their entertainment to be interrupted.

But Telemachus’ death did not go unnoticed, for it touched the heart of the watching emperor. Impacted by the saint’s death, Emperor Honorius then issued a ban that ceased all gladiator fights within Rome.

The story of St. Telemachus is aspiring. And though there are differing details in the stories of his legend, which make it difficult to know exactly what happened, one thing remains constant: Telemachus was a man who was struck to the heart by the violence of the gladiators, and he was willing to sacrifice his own life to make a difference. Telemachus was willing to follow the example of his Savior, who had sacrificed himself upon a cross to save the world, and to give up what he could not get back, in order to show love and compassion.

Even today, the stories of Jesus and Telemachus are amazing, and should be stories we keep in the back of our own minds as we make our own statements. For too often, we let our pride get in our way and worry more about being right than being love. Continue reading

All of Me

Unlike my favorite book and my favorite movies, my favorite song does not stay consistent. But one thing which is consistent about it, is that it usually changes every three months. Two reasons for this, is because one, I usually listen and listen and listen to it, until I burn myself out. And two, because my life changes; therefore, different lyrics tend to speak louder at different times, depending on my mood and what I’m going through.

At the moment, my favorite song is Ashes Remain’s “All of Me.” A song that spoke loudly to me when I heard it on the radio. A song that has become an anthem for my life. And a song that I’d like to share with you: