Like a Moth

Most people do not like bugs. Just the word makes them squirm and remark with, “Gross!” There are only a handful of these creepy crawlies that the average person likes, such as ladybugs, praying mantises, and the colorful butterfly. However, many do not like their close relative–the moth. True, their larvae do dine on clothes, but there are some moths, like the luna moth, that are just as beautiful, if arguably not more, than their cousins.

One interesting thing about moths, is how they’re attracted to light. Not only to porch lights, but even to bug zappers and to campfires. Moths are so attracted to bright light, they will follow it even if it kills them. Scientists have some theories of why these insects have this bizarre behavior, believing they may possibly use the moon to navigate and these other light sources throw off this instinct; however, they are only theories, with scientists still searching for the answer to this mystery.

There is a phrase that is connected to this behavior, “like a moth to a flame,” which describes dangerous behaviors, such as greed, lust, and gambling. However, what if we look at this phrase from another perspective? What would it be like, if we were willing to chase after God like how a moth chases light? Not merely satisfied in seeing Him from a distance or reading descriptions about Him, but truly desiring to get close and personal with Him? even if it causes us physical harm, or even, forfeit our lives?

For God is something beautiful that attracts us. Yet, He is not safe. He is good, but He is also holy. And with sin still tainting our nature, if we even glimpsed upon His full glory, the sight alone would kill us because He is so holy: “Moses said [to God], ‘Please show me your glory.’ And he said, ‘I will make all my goodness pass before you and will proclaim before you my name ‘The LORD.’ And I will be gracious to whom I will be gracious, and will show mercy on whom I will show mercy. But,’ he said, ‘you cannot see my face, for man shall not see me and live'” (Exodus 33:18-20).

Yet, what if we chased God with the same desire of a moth? Being willing to draw close, even willing to forfeit our lives just to get the chance to be near something so awesome? What would happen if we quit playing it safe? Having the thirst to chase after God–to get close, instead of pushing Him away? Being like Moses, having a want to see God and not satisfied with only stories of Him?

Many scoff at the moth, favoring butterflies and thinking the moth as a fool for chasing after things that can kill them. But what would happen, if the church learned from the moth, and was more willing to chase after the light of the world?

“In the year that King Uzziah died I saw the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up; and the train of his robe filled the temple. Above him stood the seraphim. Each had six wings: with two he covered his face, and with two he covered his feet, and with two he flew. And one called to another and said:

‘Holy, holy, holy is the LORD of hosts;
the whole earth is full of his glory!’

And the foundations of the thresholds shook at the voice of him who called, and the house was filled with smoke. And I said: ‘Woe is me! For I am lost; for I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips; for my eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts!’

Then one of the seraphim flew to me, having in his hand a burning coal that he had taken with tongs from the altar. And he touched my mouth and said: ‘Behold, this has touched your lips; your guilt is taken away, and your sin atoned for'” (Isaiah 6:1-7).

 

~Photo Obtained

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